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The Research & Development Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Energy Efficiency (R&D CAMEE) at the Southern Virginia Higher Education Center (SVHEC) has been CLT panel being machined on 5axis CNC routerawarded its second grant from the Center for Innovative Technology in Herndon, Virginia.

The $78,000 Commonwealth Research Commercialization Fund (CRCF) award will be used to advance Virginia’s capacity to manufacture Cross-Laminated Timbers (CLTs) out of Southern Yellow Pine. If R&D CAMEE is successful in certifying Southern Yellow Pine as a CLT building material it will open the doors to new manufacturing operations in southern Virginia that could lead to economic development and job growth.

“Energy has been identified as an important economic development opportunity for the state, and CLTs fit into that wider discussion,” said SVHEC Director of Research & Development David Kenealy. “CLTs are clearly on the radar, and buildings using these panels are now going up in the U.S. If Southern Yellow Pine is certified as an approved material that opens the doors to a range of possibilities for new manufacturing in southern Virginia,” he continued.

awfstrophy-webThe International Woodworking Fair (IWF) is held every other year in Atlanta, GA. Among the competition categories is the Design Emphasis Award for advanced-level design students who excel in six categories: Case Goods, Commercial/Office/Hospitality Furniture, Design Creativity, Occasional Furniture, Ready-to-Assemble (RTA), and Seating. The winner in each of these categories is given a beautifully curved solid wood trophy designed by the late Sam Maloof.

Because IWF has a limited supply of the Maloof trophies, they approached R&D CAMEE in 2012 to re-create the iconic award. Using our reverse engineering, CAD, and CNC capabilities, R&D CAMEE replicated the beautifully curved, wooden trophy. Today, R&D CAMEE is proud to partner with IWF to produce the trophies for this prestigious, bi-annual woodworking competition.

 

This summer, the R&D Center for Advanced Manufacturing & Energy Efficiency (R&D CAMEE) was contacted by the American Society of Furniture Designers (ASFD) with a request to design-for-manufacture and produce their new Pinnacle Award. The Pinnacle Awards were created in April 1995 by the ASFD Board of Directors to promote design quality and encourage the recognition of furniture designers within the retail home furnishings industry. Each year the award is given out at the High Point Furniture Market award dinner.

SVHEC to use the same technology in its classrooms that companies worldwide
depend on to design some of today’s most sophisticated products

cadlabToday, the SVHEC announced it received an in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software, with a commercial value of $94 million.

The SVHEC will adopt the software for students training in Product Design & Development (a program offered in partnership with Danville Community College), and for use in the R&D Center for Advanced Manufacturing & Energy Efficiency (R&D CAMEE). R&D CAMEE will use Siemens PLM software for workforce training, and to resolve advanced manufacturing product development and process solutions for regional business and industry.

The software adoption gives students and industries across southern Virginia access to the same technology that companies around the world depend on every day to develop innovative products in a wide variety of industries including automotive, aerospace, machinery, shipbuilding, high-tech electronics and many more. Graduates with this type of software training are highly-recruited candidates for advanced technology jobs.

The in-kind grant for the SVHEC includes Siemens PLM Software’s Teamcenter® portfolio, the world’s most widely used digital lifecycle management software, NX™ software, a leading integrated solution for computer-aided design, manufacturing and engineering (CAD/CAM/CAE), and Solid Edge® software, the most complete hybrid 2D/3D CAD system.

During their visit, the students, who have developed strong skills in virtual reality and 3D modeling and simulation, were immersed into the world of advanced manufacturing and given an opportunity to translate their digital skills to the physical world. Additionally, they received first-hand experience in the SVHEC's R&D Center for Advanced Manufacturing & Energy Efficiency's process of art to part to mart--the method of taking a product from conceptualization to production and eventually commercialization. "It was amazing to see how much goes into linking design to actually engineering the product--art to part to mart. Everything from a pencil to an Intel computer chip goes through that process," said VREP student Jonathan Clark.